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Garden Tips

PUTTING THE YARD AND GARDEN TO BED FOR THE WINTER

GARDEN TIPS – written by Marianne C. Ophardt
WSU Extension Faculty
for the Tri-City Herald, Kennewick, WA Written October 25, 2015

I occasionally get asked to give a presentation on “putting the yard and garden to bed for the winter.” Fall garden chores are pretty simple and can be designated as “should-do” and “good-to-do”. I am not sure I could give a thirty minute or longer presentation, but here are the “should-do’s” for fall.

RAKE LEAVES: On the should-should do list is raking leaves. If you have a number of trees like I do, the leaves can certainly pile up. They tend to blow around and pile up at my back door and elsewhere in the landscape. As we start to get more dew and moisture, these leaves can mat down and smother the grass and other plants. Get those leaves raked up and consider using them for making compost or tilling them into your vegetable garden soil where they will decompose over the winter and help improve the soil.

MOW THE GRASS: After the stress of a very hot summer, your lawn needs all the help it can get. You should keep mowing if the lawn is growing. Do not mow the grass extra short and then put the mower away. Also, do not leave it extra long, as this can lead to matted grass and favorable conditions for snow mold. (This past spring snow mold fungus showed up in many area lawns and caused significant damage.) Mow at the recommended height of about 2.5 inches until you no longer need to mow. The good news is that as the weather cools, you will not need to mow as often.

TREAT FOR BROADLEAF WEEDS: If broadleaf weeds, like dandelions or clover, have shown up all over your lawn, now is the time you should treat for these weeds with an herbicide spray. However, if you only have a few of these weeds here and there, dig them out by hand or pop them out with a “weed popper.”

Herbicide sprays for broadleaf weeds will not control grassy weeds. Annual grasses, such as crabgrass will die with a hard frost, and need to be controlled next spring with pre-emergent herbicides or “preventers” that will keep the seed from germinating and growing. Perennial grasses, such as Bermuda grass, are not controlled with fall chemical applications.

DIG TENDER BULBS: Many of the tender bulbs, corms, rhizomes, and tubers that we plant in our gardens, including cannas, calla lilies, gladiolas, and dahlias, are tropical plants from warmer climates (Zones 7 to10) where they can stay in the ground over the winter. In cooler climates (Zones 6 and lower) like ours, they should be dug each fall and stored for the winter in a cool, dry protected location where they will not freeze. Some years in our area these tubers and bulbs may survive if left in the ground and heavily mulched. However, if winter brings severely cold temperatures, they will be killed.

To store them, wait about two weeks after frost kills their tops and then carefully lift the tubers, rhizomes or corms from the soil; shake off as much of the soil as possible; rinse them with clean water; and let them dry in a protected dry spot. Place them in cardboard boxes or paper bags using dry sawdust, wood shavings, or peat moss for packing.

You know, maybe I could give a talk on getting your yard and garden ready for winter. There seems to be a lot to do in the fall. More soon on the “good-to-do” fall garden tasks.

Garden Tips, WSU Extension, Benton County, 5600-E West Canal Drive, Kennewick, WA 99336-1387, 509-735-3551, Contact Us

WSU Extension, Franklin County, 1016 North 4th Ave, Pasco, WA 99301-3706, 509-545-3511, Contact Us
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